Using a custom ISP programming tool

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Using a custom ISP programming tool

Sterling Peet

     I think that I need to write/modify a programmer definition in avrdude to write the firmware into an AVR project that I am working on.  I would like to avoid re-inventing the wheel where I can, and I am interested in suggestions regarding where to start and how to approach this problem.

     I have inherited a project that contains virgin ATmega328 behind an FPGA that needs to be programmed.  I do not easily have direct access the to pcb hardware.  I do know how the FPGA is connected to the ATmega328, and the FPGA has access to the SPI and Reset lines for the ATmega328.  I also know how to communicate with the FPGA over a UDP socket.  Currently, the FPGA can communicate with the ATmega328 using either SPI or UART, but the communication between the computer and the FPGA uses 32-bit words.

    It is likely that I can convince the FPGA engineer to make small firmware changes, if that makes programming the ATmega328 firmware significantly easier.  Unfortunately, I do not have the full control of the hardware design that I am used to having, so my normal method of using a standard AVRISP header and programmer tool is not an option.

   The FPGA engineer has provided me a script that toggles the reset line and demonstrates FPGA interaction described in the firmware programming section of the ATmega328 data sheet, so I believe I should be able to write some relatively basic plumbing code to connect between avrdude and the FPGA to program the ATmega328.

   How should I proceed?  Are there any recommendations for this type of setup?

Thanks,

Sterling Peet

Embedded Developer
Gamma-Ray Camera Group
CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
Georgia Institute of Technology
837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
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Re: Using a custom ISP programming tool

Daniel Rozsnyó
One of the simpler approaches would be to emulate some simple serial
line programmer - with a proxy program, which presents itself on a
socket (which will be used by avrdude) and translate the high level
commands to your bit toggling in actual hardware.

And later updates might move your software translation piece into the
hardware side.


Daniel


On 08/19/2014 05:14 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:

>
>       I think that I need to write/modify a programmer definition in avrdude to write the firmware into an AVR project that I am working on.  I would like to avoid re-inventing the wheel where I can, and I am interested in suggestions regarding where to start and how to approach this problem.
>
>       I have inherited a project that contains virgin ATmega328 behind an FPGA that needs to be programmed.  I do not easily have direct access the to pcb hardware.  I do know how the FPGA is connected to the ATmega328, and the FPGA has access to the SPI and Reset lines for the ATmega328.  I also know how to communicate with the FPGA over a UDP socket.  Currently, the FPGA can communicate with the ATmega328 using either SPI or UART, but the communication between the computer and the FPGA uses 32-bit words.
>
>      It is likely that I can convince the FPGA engineer to make small firmware changes, if that makes programming the ATmega328 firmware significantly easier.  Unfortunately, I do not have the full control of the hardware design that I am used to having, so my normal method of using a standard AVRISP header and programmer tool is not an option.
>
>     The FPGA engineer has provided me a script that toggles the reset line and demonstrates FPGA interaction described in the firmware programming section of the ATmega328 data sheet, so I believe I should be able to write some relatively basic plumbing code to connect between avrdude and the FPGA to program the ATmega328.
>
>     How should I proceed?  Are there any recommendations for this type of setup?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sterling Peet
>
> Embedded Developer
> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
> Georgia Institute of Technology
> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
> _______________________________________________
> AVR-chat mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat
>

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Re: Using a custom ISP programming tool

Sterling Peet
Daniel,

    A serial emulator is the first idea that I originally began to consider, and may well be the initial solution.

    I'm not sure if I don't quite understand some of your proxy suggestion, or if I didn't quite provide enough information in my previous email.

    The FPGA contains it's own network stack, and is not connected directly to the computer that is attempting to load the firmware onto the ATmega328 (except via TCP/IP).  Since the FPGA already translates data I send it in a UDP packet to the hardware bit toggling, I am currently mostly just concerned with packing and unpacking the the UDP packets in such a way that avrdude can communicate with the remote FPGA.

    The FPGA could be described as having an ATmega328 connected to a normal usb programmer on a computer with IP address 10.0.0.5, and a UDP to USB serial bridge deamon listening on a particular port.  I want to run avrdude on a different computer with IP address 10.0.0.9 to program the ATmega328.

    Since the AVR is usually programmed directly from the computer the programmer is connected to, I didn't think there was already a provision for using avrdude over a network connection.

    It would be preferable to avoid running a separate deamon to bridge avrdude to the network, but if that is likely to significantly increase the amount of work then I can tolerate it.  Should I try to pursue developing a new programmer type for avrdude?

Thanks,

Sterling Peet

Embedded Developer
Gamma-Ray Camera Group
CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
Georgia Institute of Technology
837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430


On Aug 19, 2014, at 11:50 AM, "Ing. Daniel Rozsnyó" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> One of the simpler approaches would be to emulate some simple serial line programmer - with a proxy program, which presents itself on a socket (which will be used by avrdude) and translate the high level commands to your bit toggling in actual hardware.
>
> And later updates might move your software translation piece into the hardware side.
>
>
> Daniel
>
>
> On 08/19/2014 05:14 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:
>>
>>      I think that I need to write/modify a programmer definition in avrdude to write the firmware into an AVR project that I am working on.  I would like to avoid re-inventing the wheel where I can, and I am interested in suggestions regarding where to start and how to approach this problem.
>>
>>      I have inherited a project that contains virgin ATmega328 behind an FPGA that needs to be programmed.  I do not easily have direct access the to pcb hardware.  I do know how the FPGA is connected to the ATmega328, and the FPGA has access to the SPI and Reset lines for the ATmega328.  I also know how to communicate with the FPGA over a UDP socket.  Currently, the FPGA can communicate with the ATmega328 using either SPI or UART, but the communication between the computer and the FPGA uses 32-bit words.
>>
>>     It is likely that I can convince the FPGA engineer to make small firmware changes, if that makes programming the ATmega328 firmware significantly easier.  Unfortunately, I do not have the full control of the hardware design that I am used to having, so my normal method of using a standard AVRISP header and programmer tool is not an option.
>>
>>    The FPGA engineer has provided me a script that toggles the reset line and demonstrates FPGA interaction described in the firmware programming section of the ATmega328 data sheet, so I believe I should be able to write some relatively basic plumbing code to connect between avrdude and the FPGA to program the ATmega328.
>>
>>    How should I proceed?  Are there any recommendations for this type of setup?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Sterling Peet
>>
>> Embedded Developer
>> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
>> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
>> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
>> Georgia Institute of Technology
>> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
>> _______________________________________________
>> AVR-chat mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> AVR-chat mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat


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Re: Using a custom ISP programming tool

Daniel Rozsnyó
Then just fork the nonaccelerated FTDI bitbang code (e.g. FT245R
programmer). It implements the programming and mcu communication, all
you need to do is to transmit the port writes and reads over your
network stack. You need to adhere to rules set by avrdude coding here.

My suggestion was to use the buspirate programmer, which communicates
over serial line protocol. The serial line interconnection allows you to
run it over a local socket and decouple your code from avrdude into a
separate tool (maybe you can do the communication more efficiently in
high level language other than C, it can use any threading coding
method, etc..). It also allows you to create this add-on and no need in
changing anything in avrdude, which might help distribution.

All programmers which use serial lines can be run over a network easily,
in terms of TCP/IP bidirectional streams. For your UDP packetization,
you need an intermediate proxy program, to do the translation.

Clear now?


On 08/19/2014 08:04 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:

> Daniel,
>
>      A serial emulator is the first idea that I originally began to consider, and may well be the initial solution.
>
>      I'm not sure if I don't quite understand some of your proxy suggestion, or if I didn't quite provide enough information in my previous email.
>
>      The FPGA contains it's own network stack, and is not connected directly to the computer that is attempting to load the firmware onto the ATmega328 (except via TCP/IP).  Since the FPGA already translates data I send it in a UDP packet to the hardware bit toggling, I am currently mostly just concerned with packing and unpacking the the UDP packets in such a way that avrdude can communicate with the remote FPGA.
>
>      The FPGA could be described as having an ATmega328 connected to a normal usb programmer on a computer with IP address 10.0.0.5, and a UDP to USB serial bridge deamon listening on a particular port.  I want to run avrdude on a different computer with IP address 10.0.0.9 to program the ATmega328.
>
>      Since the AVR is usually programmed directly from the computer the programmer is connected to, I didn't think there was already a provision for using avrdude over a network connection.
>
>      It would be preferable to avoid running a separate deamon to bridge avrdude to the network, but if that is likely to significantly increase the amount of work then I can tolerate it.  Should I try to pursue developing a new programmer type for avrdude?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sterling Peet
>
> Embedded Developer
> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
> Georgia Institute of Technology
> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
>
>
> On Aug 19, 2014, at 11:50 AM, "Ing. Daniel Rozsnyó" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> One of the simpler approaches would be to emulate some simple serial line programmer - with a proxy program, which presents itself on a socket (which will be used by avrdude) and translate the high level commands to your bit toggling in actual hardware.
>>
>> And later updates might move your software translation piece into the hardware side.
>>
>>
>> Daniel
>>
>>
>> On 08/19/2014 05:14 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:
>>>       I think that I need to write/modify a programmer definition in avrdude to write the firmware into an AVR project that I am working on.  I would like to avoid re-inventing the wheel where I can, and I am interested in suggestions regarding where to start and how to approach this problem.
>>>
>>>       I have inherited a project that contains virgin ATmega328 behind an FPGA that needs to be programmed.  I do not easily have direct access the to pcb hardware.  I do know how the FPGA is connected to the ATmega328, and the FPGA has access to the SPI and Reset lines for the ATmega328.  I also know how to communicate with the FPGA over a UDP socket.  Currently, the FPGA can communicate with the ATmega328 using either SPI or UART, but the communication between the computer and the FPGA uses 32-bit words.
>>>
>>>      It is likely that I can convince the FPGA engineer to make small firmware changes, if that makes programming the ATmega328 firmware significantly easier.  Unfortunately, I do not have the full control of the hardware design that I am used to having, so my normal method of using a standard AVRISP header and programmer tool is not an option.
>>>
>>>     The FPGA engineer has provided me a script that toggles the reset line and demonstrates FPGA interaction described in the firmware programming section of the ATmega328 data sheet, so I believe I should be able to write some relatively basic plumbing code to connect between avrdude and the FPGA to program the ATmega328.
>>>
>>>     How should I proceed?  Are there any recommendations for this type of setup?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Sterling Peet
>>>
>>> Embedded Developer
>>> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
>>> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
>>> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
>>> Georgia Institute of Technology
>>> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> AVR-chat mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> AVR-chat mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat



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Re: Using a custom ISP programming tool

Sterling Peet

    Yes, that gives me a great place to start!  I'll give it a shot and see how it goes.

Thanks,

Sterling Peet

Embedded Developer
Gamma-Ray Camera Group
CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
Georgia Institute of Technology
837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430


On Aug 19, 2014, at 2:22 PM, "Ing. Daniel Rozsnyó" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Then just fork the nonaccelerated FTDI bitbang code (e.g. FT245R programmer). It implements the programming and mcu communication, all you need to do is to transmit the port writes and reads over your network stack. You need to adhere to rules set by avrdude coding here.
>
> My suggestion was to use the buspirate programmer, which communicates over serial line protocol. The serial line interconnection allows you to run it over a local socket and decouple your code from avrdude into a separate tool (maybe you can do the communication more efficiently in high level language other than C, it can use any threading coding method, etc..). It also allows you to create this add-on and no need in changing anything in avrdude, which might help distribution.
>
> All programmers which use serial lines can be run over a network easily, in terms of TCP/IP bidirectional streams. For your UDP packetization, you need an intermediate proxy program, to do the translation.
>
> Clear now?
>
>
> On 08/19/2014 08:04 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:
>> Daniel,
>>
>>     A serial emulator is the first idea that I originally began to consider, and may well be the initial solution.
>>
>>     I'm not sure if I don't quite understand some of your proxy suggestion, or if I didn't quite provide enough information in my previous email.
>>
>>     The FPGA contains it's own network stack, and is not connected directly to the computer that is attempting to load the firmware onto the ATmega328 (except via TCP/IP).  Since the FPGA already translates data I send it in a UDP packet to the hardware bit toggling, I am currently mostly just concerned with packing and unpacking the the UDP packets in such a way that avrdude can communicate with the remote FPGA.
>>
>>     The FPGA could be described as having an ATmega328 connected to a normal usb programmer on a computer with IP address 10.0.0.5, and a UDP to USB serial bridge deamon listening on a particular port.  I want to run avrdude on a different computer with IP address 10.0.0.9 to program the ATmega328.
>>
>>     Since the AVR is usually programmed directly from the computer the programmer is connected to, I didn't think there was already a provision for using avrdude over a network connection.
>>
>>     It would be preferable to avoid running a separate deamon to bridge avrdude to the network, but if that is likely to significantly increase the amount of work then I can tolerate it.  Should I try to pursue developing a new programmer type for avrdude?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Sterling Peet
>>
>> Embedded Developer
>> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
>> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
>> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
>> Georgia Institute of Technology
>> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
>>
>>
>> On Aug 19, 2014, at 11:50 AM, "Ing. Daniel Rozsnyó" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> One of the simpler approaches would be to emulate some simple serial line programmer - with a proxy program, which presents itself on a socket (which will be used by avrdude) and translate the high level commands to your bit toggling in actual hardware.
>>>
>>> And later updates might move your software translation piece into the hardware side.
>>>
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>>
>>>
>>> On 08/19/2014 05:14 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:
>>>>      I think that I need to write/modify a programmer definition in avrdude to write the firmware into an AVR project that I am working on.  I would like to avoid re-inventing the wheel where I can, and I am interested in suggestions regarding where to start and how to approach this problem.
>>>>
>>>>      I have inherited a project that contains virgin ATmega328 behind an FPGA that needs to be programmed.  I do not easily have direct access the to pcb hardware.  I do know how the FPGA is connected to the ATmega328, and the FPGA has access to the SPI and Reset lines for the ATmega328.  I also know how to communicate with the FPGA over a UDP socket.  Currently, the FPGA can communicate with the ATmega328 using either SPI or UART, but the communication between the computer and the FPGA uses 32-bit words.
>>>>
>>>>     It is likely that I can convince the FPGA engineer to make small firmware changes, if that makes programming the ATmega328 firmware significantly easier.  Unfortunately, I do not have the full control of the hardware design that I am used to having, so my normal method of using a standard AVRISP header and programmer tool is not an option.
>>>>
>>>>    The FPGA engineer has provided me a script that toggles the reset line and demonstrates FPGA interaction described in the firmware programming section of the ATmega328 data sheet, so I believe I should be able to write some relatively basic plumbing code to connect between avrdude and the FPGA to program the ATmega328.
>>>>
>>>>    How should I proceed?  Are there any recommendations for this type of setup?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>>
>>>> Sterling Peet
>>>>
>>>> Embedded Developer
>>>> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
>>>> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
>>>> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
>>>> Georgia Institute of Technology
>>>> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> AVR-chat mailing list
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat
>>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> AVR-chat mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat
>
>


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Re: Using a custom ISP programming tool

Sterling Peet

    Sure, I might decide to build up my own network based programming tool for personal use too!  I looked around but I didn't see where the avrdude coding rules are located.  Are they in the source repository somewhere?

Thanks,

Sterling Peet

Embedded Developer
Gamma-Ray Camera Group
CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
Georgia Institute of Technology
837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430


On Aug 19, 2014, at 2:41 PM, "Ing. Daniel Rozsnyó" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Could you then share the result? I always wanted to do a network attached programmer, and reusing your code/tool I can code a simple ENC28J60+AVR device to act as your FPGA (I already have a network stack in my miniature AVR OS... just need to code the equivalent of data unpacking/presentation which your FPGA does).
>
> Regards,
>
> Daniel
>
> On 08/19/2014 08:37 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:
>>     Yes, that gives me a great place to start!  I'll give it a shot and see how it goes.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Sterling Peet
>>
>> Embedded Developer
>> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
>> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
>> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
>> Georgia Institute of Technology
>> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
>>
>>
>> On Aug 19, 2014, at 2:22 PM, "Ing. Daniel Rozsnyó" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> Then just fork the nonaccelerated FTDI bitbang code (e.g. FT245R programmer). It implements the programming and mcu communication, all you need to do is to transmit the port writes and reads over your network stack. You need to adhere to rules set by avrdude coding here.
>>>
>>> My suggestion was to use the buspirate programmer, which communicates over serial line protocol. The serial line interconnection allows you to run it over a local socket and decouple your code from avrdude into a separate tool (maybe you can do the communication more efficiently in high level language other than C, it can use any threading coding method, etc..). It also allows you to create this add-on and no need in changing anything in avrdude, which might help distribution.
>>>
>>> All programmers which use serial lines can be run over a network easily, in terms of TCP/IP bidirectional streams. For your UDP packetization, you need an intermediate proxy program, to do the translation.
>>>
>>> Clear now?
>>>
>>>
>>> On 08/19/2014 08:04 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:
>>>> Daniel,
>>>>
>>>>     A serial emulator is the first idea that I originally began to consider, and may well be the initial solution.
>>>>
>>>>     I'm not sure if I don't quite understand some of your proxy suggestion, or if I didn't quite provide enough information in my previous email.
>>>>
>>>>     The FPGA contains it's own network stack, and is not connected directly to the computer that is attempting to load the firmware onto the ATmega328 (except via TCP/IP).  Since the FPGA already translates data I send it in a UDP packet to the hardware bit toggling, I am currently mostly just concerned with packing and unpacking the the UDP packets in such a way that avrdude can communicate with the remote FPGA.
>>>>
>>>>     The FPGA could be described as having an ATmega328 connected to a normal usb programmer on a computer with IP address 10.0.0.5, and a UDP to USB serial bridge deamon listening on a particular port.  I want to run avrdude on a different computer with IP address 10.0.0.9 to program the ATmega328.
>>>>
>>>>     Since the AVR is usually programmed directly from the computer the programmer is connected to, I didn't think there was already a provision for using avrdude over a network connection.
>>>>
>>>>     It would be preferable to avoid running a separate deamon to bridge avrdude to the network, but if that is likely to significantly increase the amount of work then I can tolerate it.  Should I try to pursue developing a new programmer type for avrdude?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>>
>>>> Sterling Peet
>>>>
>>>> Embedded Developer
>>>> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
>>>> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
>>>> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
>>>> Georgia Institute of Technology
>>>> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Aug 19, 2014, at 11:50 AM, "Ing. Daniel Rozsnyó" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> One of the simpler approaches would be to emulate some simple serial line programmer - with a proxy program, which presents itself on a socket (which will be used by avrdude) and translate the high level commands to your bit toggling in actual hardware.
>>>>>
>>>>> And later updates might move your software translation piece into the hardware side.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Daniel
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On 08/19/2014 05:14 PM, Sterling Peet wrote:
>>>>>>      I think that I need to write/modify a programmer definition in avrdude to write the firmware into an AVR project that I am working on.  I would like to avoid re-inventing the wheel where I can, and I am interested in suggestions regarding where to start and how to approach this problem.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>      I have inherited a project that contains virgin ATmega328 behind an FPGA that needs to be programmed.  I do not easily have direct access the to pcb hardware.  I do know how the FPGA is connected to the ATmega328, and the FPGA has access to the SPI and Reset lines for the ATmega328.  I also know how to communicate with the FPGA over a UDP socket.  Currently, the FPGA can communicate with the ATmega328 using either SPI or UART, but the communication between the computer and the FPGA uses 32-bit words.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>     It is likely that I can convince the FPGA engineer to make small firmware changes, if that makes programming the ATmega328 firmware significantly easier.  Unfortunately, I do not have the full control of the hardware design that I am used to having, so my normal method of using a standard AVRISP header and programmer tool is not an option.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>    The FPGA engineer has provided me a script that toggles the reset line and demonstrates FPGA interaction described in the firmware programming section of the ATmega328 data sheet, so I believe I should be able to write some relatively basic plumbing code to connect between avrdude and the FPGA to program the ATmega328.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>    How should I proceed?  Are there any recommendations for this type of setup?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Sterling Peet
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Embedded Developer
>>>>>> Gamma-Ray Camera Group
>>>>>> CTA Gamma-Ray Observatory Development
>>>>>> School of Physics & Center for Relativistic Astrophysics
>>>>>> Georgia Institute of Technology
>>>>>> 837 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430
>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>> AVR-chat mailing list
>>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>>> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat
>>>>>>
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> AVR-chat mailing list
>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>> https://lists.nongnu.org/mailman/listinfo/avr-chat
>>>
>
>


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Re: Using a custom ISP programming tool

Joerg Wunsch
Sterling Peet <[hidden email]> wrote:

>  I looked around but I didn't see where the avrdude coding
> rules are located.  Are they in the source repository somewhere?

Basically, follow the existing style.  There are no formal
coding rules.

Btw., for programming protocols that talk through a serial
port normally (like, STK500v2), there already exists code
to use a network TCP transport.  So far, it's only implemented
for POSIX systems (Unix-like), see net_open() in ser_posix.c.
--
cheers, Joerg               .-.-.   --... ...--   -.. .  DL8DTL

http://www.sax.de/~joerg/
Never trust an operating system you don't have sources for. ;-)

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